2024 Total Solar Eclipse

2024 Solar Eclipse Business & Community Resources

On April 8, 2024, the Adirondack region in New York State will be directly in the path of totality for a Total Solar Eclipse. This is not only an amazing sight but a rare occurrence. In fact, it will be the first time the Adirondacks have ever been in the direct path of totality, and after 2024 the United States will not see another total solar eclipse for over 20 years.

 

To prepare and excite our community for the incredible shared experience, we are collaborating with community partners to provide information, resources, and tools as we lead up to the path of totality. Be sure to check back as more information will continually be added.

Adirondack Branded Eclipse Glasses – DEADLINE TO ORDER HAS PASSED

To celebrate this rare event, ROOST partnered with the Adirondack Sky Center & Observatory to offer businesses the opportunity to purchase bulk Adirondack-branded glasses for their businesses, guests, and event attendees.

 

Where to find glasses:

 

While these glasses are no longer available, the Adirondack Sky Center & Observatory does have glasses available to purchase that are branded for their “Tupper in Totality” event. Questions? Contact them directly at info@adirondackskycenter.org.

 

Eclipse Planning Resources

Planning Tools

 

 

Information Sharing

 

We want to hear from you! Is your business or community planning a special event, changing operating hours, offering specials/promotions, etc.? As we work together to prepare this information is key. Please share your plans with us.

 

 

Public Meeting Archived Resources

 

Adirondack Eclipse Brand Materials

Eclipse ADK Brand Materials

 

Download the Eclipse ADK logo and graphics to add to your promotional materials.

Hashtag: #EclipseADK

Region & Community Specific Eclipse Logos

 

Adirondack Hub  |  Bloomingdale  |  Indian Lake  |  Inlet  |  Town of JayTown of Keene  |  Lake Champlain Region  |  Lake Placid  |  Long Lake  |  Saranac Lake  |  Speculator  |  Totality in Tupper  |  Whiteface Region  |  Wilmington

Map of Confirmed Viewing Locations in the Adirondacks

The following map is a list of confirmed viewing locations that are open to the public (for example: public parks, attractions, community events, etc.). To get your community listed on this map, email eclipse@roostadk.com or contact your ROOST regional manager today.

2024 Total Solar Eclipse in the Adirondacks FAQs

 

Browse through our list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) to find the most up-to-date information as we countdown to totality in the Adirondacks.

Being in the path of totality for a solar eclipse means you are in the direct path where the moon passes between the sun and Earth, completely blocking the sun. Places not in the path of totality only see a portion of the sun covered.

The video below offers an overview of the experiences people had during the 2017 total solar eclipse.

If your community is within the shaded area (between the outer red lines), you are in the path of totality for the April 8, 2024 eclipse. The closer to the blue center line, the longer you will be at totality.

 

See “What time will the eclipse take place on April 8, 2024?” for a list of some of the Adirondacks towns that are in the path, or use this interactive map to search your community.

 

Where you are on the path of totality dictates exactly when and how long you will experience full totality. Those closest to the center of the path will experience totality for over 3.5 minutes. View the time calculator for your community visit eclipse2024.org, and enter your town in the upper right corner.

 

The following chart highlights a small sampling of our Adirondack communities to give you a quick snapshot of the timeline of the path. It is important to note that the exact timing may vary even within one community based on your location. If there is not a time listed in the second two columns, that indicates that your location is just outside of the path and will experience a partial eclipse that is in the high 90th percentile, but not a total eclipse. View printer-friendly PDF of timing per Adirondack community.

 

TOWN PARTIAL STARTS TOTALITY STARTS TOTALITY DURATION
Arietta 2:11 p.m. – – – –
Au Sable Forks 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 25s
Benson 2:11 p.m. – – – –
Bloomingdale 2:13 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 32.1s
Blue Mountain Lake 2:12 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 2m 40s
Chestertown 2:12 p.m. – – – –
Crown Point 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 1m 12.2s
Elizabethtown 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 2m 55.7s
Essex 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 2m 58s
Hope 2:12 p.m. – – – –
Indian Lake 2:12 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 2m 3.1s
Inlet 2:11 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 2m 44.5s
Jay 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 21.9s
Keene 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 11.5s
Keene Valley 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 1.9s
Keeseville 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 25.4s
Lake Clear 2:14 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 32.7s
Lake Placid 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 21.1s
Lake Pleasant 2:11 p.m. – – – –
Lewis 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 8.0s
Long Lake 2:12 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 1.4s
Minerva 2:12 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 1m 23s
Mineville 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 2m 23.1s
Morehouse 2:11 p.m. – – – –
Moriah 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 2m 7.5s
New Russia 2:14 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 2m 47.0s
Newcomb 2:14 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 2m 44.9s
North Creek 2:12 p.m. – – – –
North Elba 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 21.1s
North Hudson 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 1m 59s
Olmstedville 2:12 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 0m 56.8s
Paradox 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 1m 17.7s
Paul Smiths 2:12 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 34.8s
Piercefield 2:12 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 32.3s
Piseco 2:11 p.m. – – – –
Port Henry 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 2m 3.2s
Raquette Lake 2:11 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 2m 46.9s
Saranac Lake 2:12 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 28.9s
Schroon Lake 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 1m 4.4s
Speculator 2:11 p.m. – – – –
St. Armand 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 29s
Ticonderoga 2:13 p.m. – – – –
Tupper Lake 2:12 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 29.8s
Upper Jay 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 19.8s
Vermontville 2:13 p.m. 3:24 p.m. 3m 33.3s
Wells 2:11 p.m. – – – –
Westport 2:13 p.m. 3:26 p.m. 2m 29s
Willsboro 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 7s
Wilmington 2:13 p.m. 3:25 p.m. 3m 25.4s

One of the biggest unknowns when it comes to a solar eclipse is anticipating crowd size. While we can’t predict exactly how many people will visit, we do anticipate a large influx of people (especially for April) to seek out the Adirondacks for our natural landscape and close proximity to population centers. As a result, we are working with community partners to prepare for this increase in visitation in what is typically our quietest time of year.

 

UPDATE: While these are not official numbers, as of October 2023, lodging properties close to the center of the path of totality are indicating an average occupancy of about 80%. This is significantly high compared to typical occupancy for this time of year.

The date of the eclipse falls on the Monday (one week after Easter weekend). As a result during most area schools’ recess for spring break. See sample area school calendars:

  • Lake Placid Central School District – March 29 – April 14, 2024
  • Tupper Lake Central School District – March 29 – April 14, 2024
  • Bouquet Valley Central School – March 28 – April 9, 2024
  • Long Lake Central School District – March 28 – April 8, 2024

To help guide our solar eclipse planning, ROOST has formed an Eclipse ADK 2024 Task Force.

The goal of the Eclipse ADK Task Force is to develop and execute a unified strategy to prepare for the 2024 solar eclipse. Members from varying backgrounds, sectors, and regions within the Adirondacks are working together to provide both residents and visitors with a safe and memorable viewing experience.

If you are interested in participating in the task force, contact us at eclipse@roostadk.com.

In anticipation of this unique event, we have launched a new website www.2024-eclipse.com to help connect locals and travelers with the most up-to-date information on watching the 2024 Total Solar Eclipse from the Adirondacks. This site will continuously be updated with the latest details, events, and resources as they become available.

In addition to the normal event planning considerations, planning a viewing party or other solar eclipse event may have some additional items to review.

 

  • Have access to solar viewing glasses available for your event attendees.
  • If you have automatic lights on buildings, parking lots, etc. near your event, be sure to turn them off.
  • Scout the venue in advance to make sure there are no obstructions blocking the view of the sun, which will be in the southwestern sky.
  • April weather can be unpredictable – we may have snow, water, mud, etc. Have a backup weather plan.
  • Make sure you have bathrooms, parking, food, and water planned out ahead of time, as event rentals and supplies will be in high demand.
  • Don’t forget your local audience. While some events tend to be planned for residents, and others more focused on visitors, a Solar Eclipse is truly for everyone. Be mindful and inclusive.
  • Consider what makes your event different or stand out. There will be a lot of competition for events/activities – be unique and memorable.
  • Think about strategies to help minimize traffic congestion from a mass exodus as soon as the eclipse concludes. Continuing activities and entertainment can help reduce this anticipated stress point.

 

Be sure to check back as more tools, resources, and information will be coming soon.

Including your events in our Adirondack Eclipse promotion is simple and FREE. Begin by adding the event to your region’s event calendar. From there it will automatically be added to be included in a variety of promotional efforts. Get started here.

If you have any questions, please reach out to your regional representative or email us at eclipse@roostadk.com.

If you are planning a promotion, event, package, or some other unique offering in the days before, during, or after the eclipse on April 8, 2024, we want to hear from you. To get started, simply reach out to your regional representative or complete this form and we will contact you directly.

To celebrate this rare event, ROOST partnered with the Adirondack Sky Center & Observatory to offer businesses the opportunity to Adirondack-Branded Glasses purchase bulk glasses for their businesses, guests, and event attendees. The deadline to order these was February 14, 2024. If you are still looking for glasses, the Adirondack Sky Center and Observatory do have a limited number of their event-branded glasses available.

 

 

Have questions about the glasses? Contact the Adirondack Sky Center & Observatory at info@adirondackskycenter.org.

We recognize the complexities of increased operations during spring break/mud season. Even without planning big eclipse viewing events, On April 8, 2024 communities in the path of totality will most likely experience an influx of visitors who come to witness this rare event. While this can be an exciting opportunity for some, for many it can also create challenges related to traffic, safety, and infrastructure.

 

To effectively address these challenges, it is imperative that a well-thought-out plan is established (even if you are not looking to attract eclipse watchers). The goal of this plan is to avoid having people arriving and parking on the sides of roads, on private property, blocking access for emergency services, leaving trash all over, etc. It’s better to err on the side of overpreparedness than to be caught unprepared.

 

If you are a community that has these concerns, we are here to help! Please reach out to your regional ROOST representative or email eclipse@roostadk.com and we will set up a time to connect to complete the Eclipse Community Preparedness Assessment Form.

No worries! Reach out to your regional representative and we will do our best to help find the answer. If you are not sure who your regional representative is then simply email eclipse@roostadk.com and we will follow up.